Business modeling and sales development

Posted by Matthew Thomas

 
 
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Imatthew-thomas-2.jpg spend a lot of time thinking about people's business models. I suppose you could say it's a genuine curiosity about how things work, coupled with an utter fascination about how people work together with their individual combinations of skills, experience, abilities, and temperament.

 

Yesterday, I spent quite a bit of time putting together a half-day seminar for prospective entrepreneurs. We'll deliver that seminar this week in four one-hour sessions as participants work in teams to design products and/or services around customer needs as they put together an overall business model.

 

All of this got me to thinking: how is business model development any different from what sales, marketing, and product development teams do within their companies?

 

ILike what you're reading? Subscribe Now!t's true, there's a lot of overlap. Sales, marketing, and product development have to build products and services that take care of customer jobs - and not just functional jobs, such as completing specific tasks - but the jobs that are about status, power, finesse, or security.

 

Those products and services also have to solve a customer problem - relieve one or more pain points - and, more than that, provide benefits and gains to the customer that at least meets a minimum set of expectations, and hopefully exceeds them.

 

And all of this for a price the customer is willing to pay.

 

So far, so good. So what's so different about working from a business model perspective?

 

  1. Comprehensive Scope. When we look at the business model, we zoom out from specifics to look at the overall way the business operates - from its cost and revenue structures to its key activities, customer relationships, and so on. This breaks down internal silos and helps to sift projects for development or discontinuation.
  2. Strategy vs. Tactics. Business modeling helps create a go-forward strategy, not just the next package to sell. It observes the trends, not just the immediate needs.
  3. Outsider viewpoint. We all get stuck in our ways of thinking sometimes. Having a neutral third party facilitating conversations and process can help transform mindsets to breakthrough.

 

Those are just three of the ways - there are more - but those are the most obvious.

 

Interested? e-mail me  or call 1.877.771.3330 x20 and we can talk.

 

Not sure you're ready for that? Check out this article on decision making in organizations. We've found it helps a lot of people!

Tao of action-reflection, primer on process

 
 
 
 
.
Read More ›

Topics: business, business plan, Matthew Thomas, business design, business model, sales

Business modeling and sales development

Posted by Matthew Thomas

 
 
Subscribe to  Sustainable Vision

Imatthew-thomas-2.jpg spend a lot of time thinking about people's business models. I suppose you could say it's a genuine curiosity about how things work, coupled with an utter fascination about how people work together with their individual combinations of skills, experience, abilities, and temperament.

 

Yesterday, I spent quite a bit of time putting together a half-day seminar for prospective entrepreneurs. We'll deliver that seminar this week in four one-hour sessions as participants work in teams to design products and/or services around customer needs as they put together an overall business model.

 

All of this got me to thinking: how is business model development any different from what sales, marketing, and product development teams do within their companies?

 

ILike what you're reading? Subscribe Now!t's true, there's a lot of overlap. Sales, marketing, and product development have to build products and services that take care of customer jobs - and not just functional jobs, such as completing specific tasks - but the jobs that are about status, power, finesse, or security.

 

Those products and services also have to solve a customer problem - relieve one or more pain points - and, more than that, provide benefits and gains to the customer that at least meets a minimum set of expectations, and hopefully exceeds them.

 

And all of this for a price the customer is willing to pay.

 

So far, so good. So what's so different about working from a business model perspective?

 

  1. Comprehensive Scope. When we look at the business model, we zoom out from specifics to look at the overall way the business operates - from its cost and revenue structures to its key activities, customer relationships, and so on. This breaks down internal silos and helps to sift projects for development or discontinuation.
  2. Strategy vs. Tactics. Business modeling helps create a go-forward strategy, not just the next package to sell. It observes the trends, not just the immediate needs.
  3. Outsider viewpoint. We all get stuck in our ways of thinking sometimes. Having a neutral third party facilitating conversations and process can help transform mindsets to breakthrough.

 

Those are just three of the ways - there are more - but those are the most obvious.

 

Interested? e-mail me  or call 1.877.771.3330 x20 and we can talk.

 

Not sure you're ready for that? Check out this article on decision making in organizations. We've found it helps a lot of people!

Tao of action-reflection, primer on process

 
 
 
 
.
Read More ›

Topics: business, business plan, Matthew Thomas, business design, business model, sales